Recent Storm Damage Posts

Preparing for a storm

12/26/2018 (Permalink)

Strong gusts of wind? Dark, fast moving clouds? Downpour of rain? These are a few warning signs that a storm is headed in your direction.Here are a few helpful tips on what you can do to prepare for a storm:

  • check the forecast- know what to expect
  • watch for signs of approaching storm- clouds, wind, rain, etc. 
  • check on neighbors who require special assistance- ensure they are in a safe zone and ensure they are prepared 
  • have flashlights and batteries on hand
  • have a battery operated radio
  • have a first aide kit
  • get manual can opener and canned foods
  • stay away from windows and doors

There is no way to be 100% prepared for a storm but you can increase your chances for survival if you take a few preventative measures. 

If you do suffer storm damage, call the professionals at SERVPRO of North Knoxville at 865.947.9992!

Winter storm safety

12/26/2018 (Permalink)

Let's be honest...we don't get a lot of snow here in Knoxville. But it doesn't take much to paralyze our city. Winter storms can last for several days and be accompanied with high winds, freezing rain, sleet, heavy snowfall and cold temperatures. Winter storms can make driving and walking extremely hazardous. Always listen to the radio and television for the latest information and instructions for your area.

Before a winter storm:

-Have a disaster plan

-Prepare a disaster supplies kit for your home and car. Include a first aid kit, canned food and a can opener, bottled water, battery operated radio, flashlight, protective clothing and blankets.

-Be aware of changing weather

During a winter storm:

-Stay indoors and dress warmly

-Eat regularly. Food provides the body with energy for producing its own heat.

-If you must go outside, wear layered clothing, gloves and a hat.

-Keep dry. Change wet clothing to prevent loss of body heat.

-If you must drive, carry a cell phone.

-Keep the gas tank full.

-Let someone know where you're going in case your car gets stuck.

If you home experiences snow or ice damage due to a winter storm, be sure to call SERVPRO of North Knoxville at 865.947.9992.

Preparing for a storm

9/26/2018 (Permalink)

With Hurricane Florence hitting the Carolinas recently, it brings to mind some of the things that we can do to prepare for a moderate to massive storm.

No matter where you live, you'll encounter storms. Most of the time these are routine, but some cause serious and dangerous problems. Here are tips for preparing for storms, and weathering them safely.
  • Always keep a battery-powered radio in your home so that you can tune to radio stations if you lose electricity. Check or change the batteries frequently.

  • Keep a flashlight in an easily accessible spot on every floor of your home. Check the batteries monthly, and replace them as needed.

  • Keep a supply of candles on hand for power failures.

  • As a safety precaution before leaving the house on vacation, unplug all electrical appliances except for those lights connected to automatic timers.

  • If you live in a storm-prone area, nail down roof shingles or use adequate adhesive to keep them from blowing off in a violent wind. For roofs with shingles that are not the seal-down type, apply a little dab of roofing cement under each tab.

  • A lightning-protection system should offer an easy, direct path for the bolt to follow into the ground and thus prevent injury or damage. Grounding rods (at least two for a house) should be placed at opposite corners of the house.

  • Don't go out during a hurricane unless you have to; however, if flooding threatens, seek high ground, and follow the instructions of civil defense personnel.

  • When a major storm is imminent, close shutters, board windows, or tape the inside of larger panes with an "X" along the full length of their diagonals. Even a light material like masking tape may give the glass the extra margin of strength it needs to resist cracking.

If you do suffer storm damage, call on SERVPRO of North Knoxville at 865-947-9992.

Spring Safety Facts and Myths

4/6/2018 (Permalink)

  • If it is not raining, then there is no danger from lightning.--- This is a myth! Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as ten miles away from rainfall. This is especially true in the western United States where thunderstorms sometimes produce very little rain.
  • The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car protect you from being struck by lightning.--- This is also a myth! Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide no protection from lightning. The steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal. Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • "Heat lightning" is a term used to describe lightning from a thunderstorm too far away for thunder to be heard.--- This is a fact!

Weather Alerts

3/22/2018 (Permalink)

BASIC WEATHER TERMS:

Warning A warning is issued when a hazardous weather or hydrologic event is occurring, imminent or likely. A warning means weather conditions pose a threat to life or property. People in the path of the storm need to take protective action.

Watch A watch is used when the risk of a hazardous weather or hydrologic event has increased significantly, but its occurrence, location or timing is still uncertain. It is intended to provide enough lead time so those who need to set their plans in motion can do so. A watch means that hazardous weather is possible. People should have a plan of action in case a storm threatens and they should listen for later information and possible warnings especially when planning travel or outdoor activities.

Advisory An advisory is issued when a hazardous weather or hydrologic event is occurring, imminent or likely. Advisories are for less serious conditions than warnings, that cause significant inconvenience and if caution is not exercised, could lead to situations that may threaten life or property.

FIRE ALERTS:

Red Flag

This is a fire weather program which highlights the onset of critical weather conditions

conducive to extensive wildfire occurrences.

Red Flag Warning

A term used by fire-weather forecasters to call attention to limited weather conditions of particular importance that may result in extreme burning conditions. It is issued when it is an on-going event or the fire weather forecaster has a high degree of confidence that Red Flag criteria will occur within 24 hours of issuance. Red Flag criteria occurs whenever a geographical area has been in a dry spell for a week or two, or for a shorter period , if before spring green-up or after fall color, and the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is high to extreme and the following forecast weather parameters are forecasted to be met:

1) a sustained wind average 15 mph or greater

2) relative humidity less than or equal to 25 percent and

3) a temperature of greater than 75 degrees F.

In some states, dry lightning and unstable air are criteria. A Fire Weather Watch may be issued prior to the Red Flag Warning.

Dealing with Spring storms

3/7/2018 (Permalink)

Spring storm season in East Tennessee can be unpredictable. Heavy winds and rain are common and we have already seen a lot of rain in the month of February. During heavy rain events it’s not uncommon for water to end up in a finished or unfinished basement. SERVPRO of North Knoxville can quickly extract the water and set up drying equipment no matter the size of the area affected. There is, however, something to keep in mind: most insurance companies DO NOT cover water losses that come from exterior sources. It’s also important to note that the source needs be stopped before extraction can begin. So when the rain stops and you have water issues in your house be sure to call SERVPRO of North Knoxville!

What to do to prepare for a storm

12/26/2017 (Permalink)

Strong gusts of wind? Dark, fast moving clouds? Downpour of rain? These are a few warning signs that a storm is headed in your direction.Here are a few helpful tips on what you can do to prepare for a storm:

  • check the forecast- know what to expect
  • watch for signs of approaching storm- clouds, wind, rain, etc. 
  • check on neighbors who require special assistance- ensure they are in a safe zone and ensure they are prepared 
  • have flashlights and batteries on hand
  • have a battery operated radio
  • have a first aide kit
  • get manual can opener and canned foods
  • stay away from windows and doors

There is no way to be 100% prepared for a storm but you can increase your chances for survival if you take a few preventative measures. 

What to do during a storm

12/26/2017 (Permalink)

If you can hear thunder, remember that you are close enough to be struck by lightening. Seek shelter immediately and do the following:

  • move to a sturdy building or car
  • get out of boats and away from water
  • unplug unnecessary appliances
  • do not take a bath or a shower
  • stay away from windows
  • if flooding is happening, get to higher ground.

One way to ensure you are safe during a natural disaster is to always be prepared.Emergency readiness plans are very useful and come in handy. Practice emergency drills and always think "what if." To help keep children and the elderly safe, practicing these drills will give them the tools to know what to do in dire situations. There are many variables that come in to play and you want to be sure that you are ready for as many as possible. 

Tips to know when severe weather strikes

9/20/2017 (Permalink)

There are so many situations that business owners face on a daily basis that sometimes things can be overlooked. One of these situations can be how to respond to severe weather in your area. Severe weather can strike any time in the Knoxville area. Here are some things to know:

TORNADO/THUNDERSTORM/WIND "WATCH" - Indicates that atmospheric conditions are such that these weather conditions may develop.

TORNADO/THUNDERSTORM/WIND "WARNING" - Indicates that these severe weather conditions have been spotted or identified on radar.

Hazardous weather conditions can develop in seconds and may not allow for formal means of communication. In the event that an employee feels that weather is immediately threatening they should consider the following actions:

TAKE COVER! Instruct employees and others in the immediate area to find a wall near the interior of the building away from windows and exterior doors. Individuals should curl into the fetal position near the wall, place their hands over their head and remain in that position until the severe weather passes. If outdoors with no shelter available, lie flat in a nearby ditch and shield head with arms.

Communicating with your employees about procedures for severe weather will help to keep everyone safe.

Spring Safety Facts and Myths!

4/5/2017 (Permalink)

  • If it is not raining, then there is no danger from lightning.--- This is a myth! Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as ten miles away from rainfall. This is especially true in the western United States where thunderstorms sometimes produce very little rain.
  • The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car protect you from being struck by lightning.--- This is also a myth! Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide no protection from lightning. The steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal. Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • "Heat lightning" is a term used to describe lightning from a thunderstorm too far away for thunder to be heard.--- This is a fact!

Weather Alerts

3/22/2017 (Permalink)

BASIC WEATHER TERMS:

Warning A warning is issued when a hazardous weather or hydrologic event is occurring, imminent or likely. A warning means weather conditions pose a threat to life or property. People in the path of the storm need to take protective action.

Watch A watch is used when the risk of a hazardous weather or hydrologic event has increased significantly, but its occurrence, location or timing is still uncertain. It is intended to provide enough lead time so those who need to set their plans in motion can do so. A watch means that hazardous weather is possible. People should have a plan of action in case a storm threatens and they should listen for later information and possible warnings especially when planning travel or outdoor activities.

Advisory An advisory is issued when a hazardous weather or hydrologic event is occurring, imminent or likely. Advisories are for less serious conditions than warnings, that cause significant inconvenience and if caution is not exercised, could lead to situations that may threaten life or property.

FIRE ALERTS:

Red Flag

This is a fire weather program which highlights the onset of critical weather conditions

conducive to extensive wildfire occurrences.

Red Flag Warning

A term used by fire-weather forecasters to call attention to limited weather conditions of particular importance that may result in extreme burning conditions. It is issued when it is an on-going event or the fire weather forecaster has a high degree of confidence that Red Flag criteria will occur within 24 hours of issuance. Red Flag criteria occurs whenever a geographical area has been in a dry spell for a week or two, or for a shorter period , if before spring green-up or after fall color, and the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is high to extreme and the following forecast weather parameters are forecasted to be met:

1) a sustained wind average 15 mph or greater

2) relative humidity less than or equal to 25 percent and

3) a temperature of greater than 75 degrees F.

In some states, dry lightning and unstable air are criteria. A Fire Weather Watch may be issued prior to the Red Flag Warning.

Are You Spring Storm Ready?

2/24/2017 (Permalink)

Only in East Tennessee can we get all 4 seasons in one week! But the season we always need to be on the watch for is Spring.


 Spring time here in the Valley can be tumultuous at best, but preparing for Mother Nature's wrath is a must. Since we've had a season of highs & lows (high/low temps, high number of days with/without rain, etc.) I'm sure there's been some wear and tear to everyone's home. It's inevitable for something constantly exposed to the elements. So that’s why we are suggesting a simple property walk around before Mother Nature comes crashing in like a drunk college kid…Think Chris Farley in 'Tommy Boy'.


 Check your storm kit


- Stock an emergency kit with water, non-perishable food, a first-aid kit, flashlights and extra batteries, and a battery-operated radio in case your power goes out.


 


Check your siding/brickwork


- Give close inspection to any gaps or missing runs of mortar.  Wind and water always find a way in, so be sure to snap back any loose pieces, and fill in any gaps.


 


Check your roof


- Make sure you don't have any loose or missing shingles. Try and eyeball from the ground. DON'T GET ON YOUR ROOF WITHOUT SOMEONE ELSE THERE!! Metal roofs are very slick even with just a little bit of fog/mist, so don't chance it! If you see any missing rivets, wait until it's 100% dry!


 


Check your HVAC unit


-Make sure that your unit hasn't become clogged with leaves over the fall, and that the area around the unit is clean and removed of debris. Also give all your connections the once over. If you notice something has gotten rusty or clogged, snap a picture and send it to your HVAC guy for an opinion.


 


Check your air filter


- The air quality in your home is very important, so make sure you're breathing the cleanest air possible by changing your filter every month. This also helps with the performance of your HVAC system.


 


Check the surrounding trees


- Mother Nature loves to play pick up sticks, so make sure you don't have any widowmakers lurking around your property with it's eyes on your house! With all the rain we've had, things could have easily shifted over the last month or so, and all it will take is one good wind to huff, and puff, and ruin your day!


 


Check your flowerbeds


- Make sure nothing has decided to take up residence in your flowerbeds over the winter that you don't approve of. Also, you may already have some early peekers, and you'll want to keep an eye on them in case we get a couple more cold snaps! (Highly likely, cause….East Tennessee!)


 


Know where your Cut-offs are


- In case you need to shut off your power/water/gas due to an emergency, go ahead and take note of your shut off locations for your property.


 


Reducing your risk of damage is always a good thing, but you can never prepare for everything. So if disaster strikes, and you need us, be sure to give us a call! We're here 24/7 to make it like it never even happened.